The Un-Typical Beach Day

Yesterday I went out to the beach to photograph. I had plans of certain portrait shots I wanted to do with someone, but life gets in the way and makes your plans crash and burn. I'm slowly learning to flow when this happens because I believe it's a re-direction to take me to something much better than what I had planned.

So, I walk out aimlessly on the sand, having no idea what I'll be photographing. By some design, the first scene I look out to is a fisherman in the distance, perfectly standing in a small hole between the bunches of grass that sway right in front of me. The grass was perfect for me as well, for it was a bit of a blanket to keep him from seeing me photograph him. On that note, it's safe to say I like to be alone and left undisturbed when I photograph. The camera puts me in another world, my mind gets to wander freely without fear of being watched or judged or criticized. It's a very sacred place for me, a space of meditation.

As I'm walking down the shore my eyes kept picking up on bits of litter sprinkled on the beach. For an odd reason, I like to think because the universe was ahead of me on this, I had a plastic bag in my satchel, so I took it out and began picking up the trash I came across. But before I put the trash in my bag, I decided I would photograph each piece. I didn't know where I was going with this idea, but I just had a hunch to do it. Many of them turned into sets of either dip or triptychs, showing the stillness of time. 

It's important to look at everything as a symbol, not only in art pieces, but life. When we confine objects to the reality we place them in, we belittle them down to a material, rather than the magically intangible qualities they hold. Any object, no matter how intricate or worthless it may seem, holds an endless array of meaning to every individual, dependent upon their own personal experiences. That is what I like about these sets of images: in reality it's nothing but a piece of trash on the beach, but through these uneventfully dull objects one can see the exquisiteness it encapsulates.  

There are three words that resonated with me for these sets: [time] [stands] [still]. You can rearrange these words to relate to any of the images, depending upon the way you view it.

There are three words that resonated with me for these sets: [time] [stands] [still]. You can rearrange these words to relate to any of the images, depending upon the way you view it.